"For both Bacon and Kafka, the spinal column is nothing but a sword beneath the skin, slipped in the body of an innocent sleeper by an executioner…
Meat is not dead flesh; it retains all the sufferings and assumes all the colours of living flesh. It manifests such delightful invention, colour and acrobatics. Bacon does not say, “Pity the beasts,” but rather that every man who suffers is a piece of meat.”
Gilles Deleuze Francis Bacon: The Logic of Sensation, p. 23
(tr. Daniel W Smith, 2003)
Image: Francis Bacon, Three Studies for a Crucifixion, 1962. Guggenheim Museum, New York.

"For both Bacon and Kafka, the spinal column is nothing but a sword beneath the skin, slipped in the body of an innocent sleeper by an executioner…

Meat is not dead flesh; it retains all the sufferings and assumes all the colours of living flesh. It manifests such delightful invention, colour and acrobatics. Bacon does not say, “Pity the beasts,” but rather that every man who suffers is a piece of meat.”

Gilles Deleuze Francis Bacon: The Logic of Sensation, p. 23

(tr. Daniel W Smith, 2003)

Image: Francis Bacon, Three Studies for a Crucifixion, 1962. Guggenheim Museum, New York.